wheelie woes
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Thread: wheelie woes

  1. #1
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    Default wheelie woes

    I'm getting frustrated trying to learn how to wheelie, read most of the wheelie threads I could find here but its still not clicking.

    I have a SMR510 09. Originally I thought I couldn't clutch up the front cause the exhaust was restricted (stock). Well I finally gutted the cans and still can't get the wheel above probably 6 inches.

    I know tons of peeps here have huskys maybe you can help.

    Rolling along in second gear at around 3500RPM. Next I pull the clutch in a very small amount (just enough to slip right? -do I need to totally disengage the clutch?) then simultaneously give it throttle, about 1/4 turn. As I give it gas the clutch is let out fairly quickly: Result = front wheel coming up a little bit. I'm trying to do all these steps as 1 smooth motion.

    Should that be enough gas to get the front up or do you need like 1/2 or more throttle turn? I see vids of people clutching up and it seems they hardly give it any extra gas, when i do it I fell im reving the crap out of it.

    Edit: running stock gearing.. Also you people with huskies do you find them power wheeling WOT in the first few gears? can't even seem to power wheelie..
    Last edited by DaViking; 04-27-2011 at 07:11 PM.

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  3. #2
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    What helped me is not driving at a constant speed and then trying to clutch it up, but rather accelerating slowly and then with 1/2 - 3/4 (I think) throttle and clutch it comes right up. Or try it out with some bump on the road to get the front up easier.

    This is on a SM630 tho.. guess you shouldn't need that much throttle ^^
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  4. #3
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    Dude, I've got the same bike and I am s h i t at wheelies.

    If the front goes up a foot it feels like 12 0 clock. I'd try messing about in a car park/industrial unit somewhere quiet away from attention, pref with a mate. There's a ton of info here how to wheelie. I think once you've got the technique, it's about confidence and total practice practice.
    2009 SMR510

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  6. #4
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    I'm not sure about this but my bike (a husky '09 SM-610) probably runs a different fuelling map in first. Because it's harder to get the front up in first than it is in 2nd! So maybe you should try it in 2nd or 3rd if you aren't already. And if civilized adjustments to the clutch and throttle don't work.... get brutal, LOL.

    And I know the DUI laws are way more stringent in the US and Europe, but in my experience it helps if you're a little drunk before you try the violent stuff; your fear and inhibitions are lower... goes without saying of course that you have to try all this on a deserted stretch.

  7. #5
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    Cruise around with constant throttle through a parking lot. Keeping the throttle constant practice bringing the clutch lever in a little bit and then quickly letting it back out to where it slips and the rpms jump up. All while keeping a constant throttle keep practicing pulling in the clutch lever and then letting it back out until you are lighting quick with it and you get a big jump in RPM. Now the next step will be to incorporate the throttle. Just as you are letting back out your clutch lever you need to be giving it throttle and the front end will come up.


    You can also just cruise around in 2nd gear at constant throttle and then suddenly chop the throttle off so that the front end dives. Then the instant you let off crank the throttle back open and the front will come up that way too.
    Last edited by DMCCOY; 04-30-2011 at 01:10 PM.
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  8. #6
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    I'm no expert but I can hold my own....

    My personal experience has taught me to learn to do wheelies from power (in 1st or 2nd) and get comfortable with using the rear brake to keep you from looping it.

    I've been riding wheelies for probably 20 years and just learned to clutch it up last year.

    Now being able to clutch it up, thats what I prefer because I can be going faster and still get the front up. I wouldn't want to clutch it up without being able to keep it from looping....

    just my 2cents.
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  9. #7
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    I think a bit of it comes down to timing. The better yours is the less gas you need to give it. I found starting out on the drz I needed 3/4-WOT to clutch it up in second, but now that I'm comfortable with it I only need 1/4-1/2.

    If I were you, I'd keep trying but slowly go for progressively more throttle on your attempts.

    Also now is a good time to get used to using the rear brake, if you're riding low wheelies try using some rear brake to bring some down, you want it to be your instinct when things get hairy. You see people on youtube that get up to or over the bp too fast and try to put their legs down by reflex and eat shit, when they could have saved it no problem.
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  10. #8
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    i dont do wheelies.. but i have.. lol, i also have a buell firebolt, my 610 is easier to wheelie for me because im not as afraid as i am with my pretty buell, and its way lighter, the buell ahs a lot more torque tho, on take off i get the rpm "s up to around 3500 on the buell let off, and just s the front end dives, i crank it back open, and it comes right up, sloight tug at the elbows tho, not a whole body tug, and with the 610 i do a mixture of both, usually from first to second gear shift, i hold in the clutch around half, get the rpms up, and dump it.. could be the wrong way.. but it works for me

  11. #9
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    It's not complicated. If the front end isn't coming up, slow down your speed and grab more throttle. Simple fact is you aren't getting enough power given your speed to lift front end. I do it like this. Rev thru 1/2 of first and shift to second, then immediately pop the clutch. If a 1/4 throttle turn isn't doing it, give it a half. If it comes up too quick, let off the throttle and bike will come down immediately.
    Don't blame the bike - I think if any bike will wheelie the SMR 510 is that bike.

  12. #10
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    Im bad at wheelies too, but some things that helped me loft (now im trying to balance) were:

    1. Noticing my power band was waaaaay lower then I thought, almost off idle in first, one finger clutch in, 1/4 throttle, pop the clutch and up it goes. Let off throttle, wot, let off throttle, wot, and it was staying up a bit longer.

    2. Getting over the feeling of "oh shit my wheel is in the air", probably the most important is getting un-psyched out about it. Once it feels normal, your much more willing to try.

    3. Find someone that knows what theyre doing and is willing to watch you look like a fool, then give pointers. Very helpful to me. This step also will unveil how irritating your exhaust is at wot and decel over and over, BRRRRAAAAAPPPP, braaaaaaaaaaa... ppppp..... pop.

    Added: Proper gear helps with confidence, and covering the rear brake usually helps, hahah.
    Last edited by DRZplease; 05-16-2011 at 08:03 PM. Reason: Safety First!
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    barely off idle on the 250 in 2nd, rolling on, accelerating, onle finger slip and a slight tug on the bars... grab 3rd and ride it.
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  14. #12
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    id like to start practicing on my smr510 but i do know without even wanting it to wot in 1st will pull it up way fast even with me weighing 220. i think ill be doing some 2nd gear clutching next time im out. my problem is i cant hit rear brake without picking my foot up off the peg. lever is about as low as it can get. i wear a star tech 2's

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    Quote Originally Posted by schino View Post
    id like to start practicing on my smr510 but i do know without even wanting it to wot in 1st will pull it up way fast even with me weighing 220. i think ill be doing some 2nd gear clutching next time im out. my problem is i cant hit rear brake without picking my foot up off the peg. lever is about as low as it can get. i wear a star tech 2's
    If you cant hit it, then you're sitting too far forwards. You should be WAY at the back of the seat. That helps get your leg and ankle in a better position.
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  16. #14
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    im no master, but on my old drz400sm (which is way less power than your husky) i had to give about 3/4 to full throttle when clutching 2nd gear.

    theres alot of good advice in this thread, unfortunately until it clicks it will probably be frustrating.

    best advice i can give.

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    Last edited by PAsystm; 05-23-2011 at 05:06 PM.
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  17. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by OUTsane View Post
    If you cant hit it, then you're sitting too far forwards. You should be WAY at the back of the seat. That helps get your leg and ankle in a better position.
    what this guy said.... lean back and keep your arms straight...ish

    and my technique is in second just tiny slip of the clutch but keep rolling the throttle untill you want the wheelie to stop.. and if you want it to come up faster then turn faster... it has to be a smooth and fluid motion

    please dont take this personally but youre on a husky 510 and i promise you its not the bike just keep practicing and one day itll click!!

    ive been riding bikes for 10 years now and ive only recently learnt hpow to clutch up wheelies and now due to all these smj guides im rocking 12 o'clocks and shifting.... at first i was relying on my smc's power to do all the work and its just not the best way to wheelie

    good luck and dont give up!
    Last edited by Dave..id; 05-24-2011 at 12:47 PM.
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  18. #16
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    use 1 finger to clutch it up. if i use two it doent work as well. i feel like i can drop it quicker.

  19. #17
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    I've been screwing around on my husky 510 for one year now, and finally I see progress. Today I shifted 2-3-4 gear for the first time.

    1 finger on the clutch, low rpm (2000ish), 2nd gear, slip the clutch at same time you open 1/2 throttle. The bike will rise up quickly. Go off the gas just a bit to hold it there. Give it some more throttle as soon as you feel the bike going down again, and shift to third (still at pretty low rpms). Repeat when going up to 4th, 5th etc.

    I found out that it is easier to hold the wheelie if you keep your rpms fairly low, dont max your gears out. I guess i shift around 4500rpm or something..

    Dont know if this is the easiest way, but at least it helped me alot. But the main thing; PRACTICE! clutch it up as often as possible, all the time this way you'll get lots of practice, and you will never have a boring ride

  20. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swiins View Post
    I've been screwing around on my husky 510 for one year now, and finally I see progress. Today I shifted 2-3-4 gear for the first time.

    1 finger on the clutch, low rpm (2000ish), 2nd gear, slip the clutch at same time you open 1/2 throttle. The bike will rise up quickly. Go off the gas just a bit to hold it there. Give it some more throttle as soon as you feel the bike going down again, and shift to third (still at pretty low rpms). Repeat when going up to 4th, 5th etc.

    I found out that it is easier to hold the wheelie if you keep your rpms fairly low, dont max your gears out. I guess i shift around 4500rpm or something..

    Dont know if this is the easiest way, but at least it helped me alot. But the main thing; PRACTICE! clutch it up as often as possible, all the time this way you'll get lots of practice, and you will never have a boring ride
    I'm no expert here but if you're going to to rely on shifting at low rpm's to maintain a wheelie...shouldn't you just work on getting to balance point?
    '09 530 EXC

  21. #19
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    All the bikes mentioned here should come up with ease. Just work on technique and on amount of gas required to get the front wheel up.

    To the guy that can't reach the rear brake while doing a wheelie......if you can reach it when you have both wheels on the ground, why can't you reach it with the front wheel in the air? Nothing should change as far as your body position.

    PS.....all you guys looking for pointers on wheelies, just know that you will crash before you learn what you're doing. You're gonna loop it once or twice; you're going to have the bars crossed up and go into a tank slapper putting the front wheel down; plus a variety of other ways you can crash while having the front wheel up in the air. Just be aware of that, and decide that you're willing to crash a couple of times before you learn.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Supermanglide View Post
    If you cant strike it, then you're sitting as well much forwards. You must turn into WAY in the back again within of the seat. That helps get your leg and ankle in an extremely much better position.
    SPAM!!!!!

    This guy is just picking a post from above and copying it in an illiterate manner. This time it just happens to be mine that he copied.

    Quote Originally Posted by OUTsane View Post
    If you cant hit it, then you're sitting too far forwards. You should be WAY at the back of the seat. That helps get your leg and ankle in a better position.


    Check his posts, they're all the same.
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  23. #21
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    he probably doesnt know how to cite his resources, get him for plagiarism LOL
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  24. #22
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    Since I'm a real greenhorn still in all things Supermoto and wheelie, I think I can share my experience sofar, to help take away any doubts of other wheelie-learners, if they believe their bike or ability render an obstacle to learning wheelies.

    The way I'm learning it (started about 2 months ago) is from standing or as slow as possible. While that's harder to learn, because one has to deal much more with sideway balance right from the start, I chose this route in the hope rolling wheelies will then be easier. I admit this is not always working out and I try more rolling wheelies then I should

    I'm starting in first gear and use the clutch. Due to the front (15) and rear (42) sprockets, I need much more than idle throttle to bring the front wheel up. Otherwise I would stall the engine. I'm not looking at the rpm, as I want to get a feel for the sound of the engine and exhaust at the right rpm.

    Always looking at the horizon, arms almost fully extended, knees "grabbing" tank, feet on the pegs, covering rear brake. Opening the throttle some and then rapidly fully engage the clutch... up comes the front. Now I should let the throttle at an almost constant position, in order for the rear-break to "grab" more downward momentum from the rear wheel, when I need/want need to go back down again.

    Right now I'm fighting the typical fear and try to let the bike raise more, getting closer to the balancing point. I'm still far away from that point as far as I can tell.

    As I said I've been practising for two months now and this is my progress sofar.

    In the beginning...


    In between...


    Just yesterday...


    Didn't reach the balancing point yet, thus didn't flip it yet... and I hope to be able to avoid that from happening

    For what it's worth... the bike I'm learning with is a 2010 Husky SMR 450. It is unmodified (engine, exhaust, gearbox, sprockets are left to factory defaults), has 50 bhp and weighs about 130 kg (with gas and battery). I'm about 70 kg (with full gear).

    Best regards...

    MacSlow
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  25. #23
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    cool vids pretty good progress.

    That first vid of all you guys riding in that hanger, man thats awesome where is it? can i come ride with you?

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    Quote Originally Posted by lateralj View Post
    cool vids pretty good progress.
    Thanks... always trying as much as I can

    Quote Originally Posted by lateralj View Post
    That first vid of all you guys riding in that hanger, man thats awesome where is it? can i come ride with you?
    That's in a decommissioned airfield hanger in Weeze, Germany. There are wheelie-workshops offered during the spring/summer. Indeed the best place to mess around with a bike.

    BTW, my latest wheelie-attempts...


    Best regards...

    MacSlow
    Last edited by MacSlow; 09-11-2011 at 10:24 AM.
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  27. #25
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    I was just checking out your last video. Your learning fast! In my personal quest for balance point I hit a stumbling block that it looks like you might be hitting too. In the video, as you wheelie, you can always see over the bars. BP is past that. It took me a while to not let off as soon as the front end blocked my vision. When I'm at BP I'm looking to the side under my bars. Great Work Man!

  28. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogboy1200 View Post
    Your learning fast!
    Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by dogboy1200 View Post
    In my personal quest for balance point I hit a stumbling block that it looks like you might be hitting too. In the video, as you wheelie, you can always see over the bars. BP is past that.


    I came close to the balance-point I think... two or three times.

    While the obscured view straight ahead is not so much a problem, the feeling of the bike becoming "light towards the back" (no idea how to describe that differently in English) and the need to put more pressure on the pegs makes it difficult.

    Looking at other people riding a wheelie at the balanace-point sitting - not standing - they have the handlebar usually a bit above their head.

    Best regards...

    MacSlow
    Die of exhaustion... not of boredom!

  29. #27
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    The location of the bars in relationship to the BP all depends on how close you sit to the tank. You can sit nearly on the tank and still see over the bars at the BP. Most people that I know do not sit that close to the tank and tend to sit further back which would likely make the bars obscure your vision.

    I tend to sit further back and usually end up looking under the bars.
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  30. #28
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    [/IMG]

    the z can get there

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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiserRolls View Post
    ... the z can get there
    Yeah, the front-fender pointing skywards is also a clear indication that one is riding at the balance-point.

    Best regards...

    MacSlow
    Die of exhaustion... not of boredom!

  32. #30
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    mac, great progress. from looking at your vids it seems like you are still leaning forward as the bike comes up. If you lean back a bit and the bike starts to feel light, then you can start to lean forward. If you are leaning forward and the bike feels light your only action is to let off the gas or use the rear brake. I find its a lot easier to lean way back and then slowly move my upper body forward. Also if you lean back, the front doesnt have to come up nearly as much!

    Sorry for the crappy vid, my drz, mostly stock in this vid.



    To Viking, its hard to make that first big step to get the wheel up. Timing is so much and these thumpers all have the torque really low. My guess is that when you are giving it gas and letting out the clutch that you are leaning forward(instinct). You need to give a little tug on the bars and lean back.

    schino, i agree that you are probably too far forward if you are having trouble getting to your brake BUT you can also take your foot off the peg and hit it just fine. I have never used the back brake but i have tried a few times just to make sure i could cover it Most bikes have enough engine braking to bring the front back down if you are quick enough as long as you dont bail off the back.
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    Ok I come from the stunt world of street bikes.. Grab a Fiddy and start using the rear break if you can wheelie a CRF50 you can pretty much jump on anything and go at it.. The balance point on a 50 is so small it helps you learn.. and if you fall off the back your not going that fast and your only about 2 ft off the ground... And by learning the rear break first gives you that peace of mind just incase you clutch it up to fast.. Thats just My thoughts to all this... Now a days you give me any thing with 2 wheels and a motor and I can wheelie for days... P.S. if your a big guys.. try a DRZ110...

  34. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by huskywarna610 View Post
    i dont do wheelies.. but i have.. lol, i also have a buell firebolt, my 610 is easier to wheelie for me because im not as afraid as i am with my pretty buell, and its way lighter, the buell ahs a lot more torque tho, on take off i get the rpm "s up to around 3500 on the buell let off, and just s the front end dives, i crank it back open, and it comes right up, sloight tug at the elbows tho, not a whole body tug, and with the 610 i do a mixture of both, usually from first to second gear shift, i hold in the clutch around half, get the rpms up, and dump it.. could be the wrong way.. but it works for me
    Wanna see a wheelie on a couple Buells? I think I may have it down........? See below.

    Quote Originally Posted by RAD460 View Post
    Ok I come from the stunt world of street bikes.. Grab a Fiddy and start using the rear break if you can wheelie a CRF50 you can pretty much jump on anything and go at it.. The balance point on a 50 is so small it helps you learn.. and if you fall off the back your not going that fast and your only about 2 ft off the ground... And by learning the rear break first gives you that peace of mind just incase you clutch it up to fast.. Thats just My thoughts to all this... Now a days you give me any thing with 2 wheels and a motor and I can wheelie for days... P.S. if your a big guys.. try a DRZ110...
    +1. That's what I learned on as well. The riding position may be a little different from a fiddy to a street bike but balance piont feels exactly the same.


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  35. #33
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    i learned on a 2stroke with no engine braking went through some rear fenders and a subframe or 2

    If it warms up today(37f right now) i plan to go out and get some GoPro vids. I want to learn circle wheelies
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  36. #34
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    Don't rely on the bike to do all the work for you.the best way to wheelie is good body English.I could pull my drz that was stock with a slip on and jetted up in fifth gear without clutching it up.takes a lotta muscle and perfect timing but I could do it

  37. #35
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    Finally getting close to 12 o'clock wheelies and even hit the BP sometimes... although I've not yet managed to scrape my license-plate. But every now and then I get the front forks parellel to the ground, which is a big accomplishment for me... being happy as hell



    But not being able to see straight ahead, when the front is that high up in the air, makes things difficult. When I shift my head and shoulder slightly to the side, in order to look around the bike, I start also "turning" that way. Any tips how to avoid this?

    Best regards...

    MacSlow
    Die of exhaustion... not of boredom!

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    so thanks for share these post its a amazing.

  39. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacSlow View Post
    Finally getting close to 12 o'clock wheelies and even hit the BP sometimes... although I've not yet managed to scrape my license-plate. But every now and then I get the front forks parellel to the ground, which is a big accomplishment for me... being happy as hell



    But not being able to see straight ahead, when the front is that high up in the air, makes things difficult. When I shift my head and shoulder slightly to the side, in order to look around the bike, I start also "turning" that way. Any tips how to avoid this?

    Best regards...

    MacSlow
    way to go mac!
    Matt
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  40. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacSlow View Post
    Finally getting close to 12 o'clock wheelies and even hit the BP sometimes... although I've not yet managed to scrape my license-plate. But every now and then I get the front forks parellel to the ground, which is a big accomplishment for me... being happy as hell



    But not being able to see straight ahead, when the front is that high up in the air, makes things difficult. When I shift my head and shoulder slightly to the side, in order to look around the bike, I start also "turning" that way. Any tips how to avoid this?

    Best regards...

    MacSlow
    Try scooting your body further to the opposite side than you are looking. Ie: if you are looking on the left side of the bike scoot your butt further to the right on the seat. This may help compensate for looking around the side of the bike.

    The other thing you can try is sit closer to the bars. Then when you get it up that high you can still see over them.
    2009 ktm 690SMC
    2014 ktm 300 xc-w
    2007 suzuki drz400sm (sold)
    2003 suzuki turbo hayabusa (sold)
    2008 yamaha yz250f (sold)

  41. #39
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    340

    Default

    Finally... able to hit the bp at will:



    It turns out that I'm able to have a good view forward by looking through the gap between the front fork and tank while at the bp... with my normal position on the seat. So there's no need to move closer to the tank or scoot side-ways. I tried both and didn't feel so comfortable with those options. But they were worth a try so thanks for the hints!

    Best regards...

    MacSlow
    Die of exhaustion... not of boredom!

  42. #40
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Ace Cafe, Putney, Barcelona
    Posts
    176

    Default

    Perhaps the name of this thread should be changed to "Wheelie Woahs!"


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