What makes the best street-tard; Revised edition - Page 5
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Thread: What makes the best street-tard; Revised edition

  1. #201
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beer_Is_So_Awesome View Post
    Haha, Every other day? The guys on the SXV forums were talking about changing your oil between 150 and 200 miles. This means that if I head out with my buddies for a Sunday ride, I'm looking at an oil change before leaving home, another at lunch time, and a third when I get home, if I plan on riding to work Monday!
    the aprilias are blowing up like crazy, you couldn't give me one, even tho they are fast but they are a lot heavier than a single.

    i change my oil every ten or twelve hours of run time. but i run and rev the piss out of my fs570 every second im on it and i run a reusable s.s. filter, so it cost 1.5 liters of mobil one for an oil change. ktm dealers recommend 1000 miles for oil changes on the rfs engined race bikes vs 3000 miles on the lc4 based engines that carry almost 3 times the oil...im ok with changing it at 500 or 600 miles or so considering im riding a 109 kg race bike that handles as good as they come...my oil is slightly dark when i change it never black...

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  3. #202
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beer_Is_So_Awesome View Post
    Haha, Every other day? The guys on the SXV forums were talking about changing your oil between 150 and 200 miles. This means that if I head out with my buddies for a Sunday ride, I'm looking at an oil change before leaving home, another at lunch time, and a third when I get home, if I plan on riding to work Monday!

    That's even more excessive. But for me, I want 1000 miles between oil changes. Anything more than that is a bike that doesn't belong on the street, IMHO.

  4. #203
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    Quote Originally Posted by ratman View Post
    im ok with changing it at 500 or 600 miles or so considering im riding a 109 kg race bike that handles as good as they come...my oil is slightly dark when i change it never black...
    Wow...my oil is the color of black coffee at 500 miles. That 500 miles is a mix of commuting and hammering on it.
    Last edited by SwitchThrottle; 12-21-2011 at 12:32 PM.
    '08 Husky sm450r (13k miles and counting)
    '03 Honda xr400r (street titled)

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  6. #204
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gription View Post
    I love my KTM690 Supermoto. It is a sweet street bike if you can only have one. I live WNC so nothing beats a street tart around here. My Friend has a 625 SMC with pipes, gearing and a jet kit. The 625 is a little more aggressive and feels faster, but the 690 is much nicer to ride day in and day out. It is hard to beat the features of a counterbalanced engine, fuel injection, big radial brake, and a slipper clutch from the factory.


    The 625 made my a$$ hurt for three days after flogging it for an hour. Nothing Vibrates like those things. I was so glad I just went for the 690SM when I couldn't find a 625 SMC or DRZ400SM in good shape.

    The only bikes that could tempt me from mine would be the 990 version, R model, KTM dual sport, or Hypermotard.
    I like your taste in bikes...

  7. #205
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    Damn, it's been a while since I checked in on this thread. I still vote for my 690 SMR as the best STREET tard (or a 690 SM or Duke, they're about identical for practical purposes), emphasis on being a good street bike while having the advantages of a motard... but I gotta say, DAMN that Berg 570 looks like an awesome machine!
    -Rob
    2010 KTM 990 SMT, 2008 KTM 690 SMR
    --
    "The KTM really likes being ridden hard. If you never ride like a dumbass, and have no intention of ever riding like a dumbass, KTM probably doesn't make a bike for you."

  8. #206
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    570 Berg is a mean street machine. Virtually indestructible motor and european quality all around (except the bolts they use. ).

    They just need some modding to make the best out of it.

  9. #207
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    Quote Originally Posted by maKe View Post
    570 Berg is a mean street machine. Virtually indestructible motor and european quality all around (except the bolts they use. ).

    They just need some modding to make the best out of it.
    if you run a dna air filter, run the akcro header and muffler, install the competition map on the ecu it will run awesome...

    bergos has a 44mm throttle body a big valve ported head and a cam...another company makes a 622cc barrel and piston kit...if you do all that and buy the user setting tool you might get it to run better than the set i initially listed...i instead plan to by a tm 530 super moto for double what it would take to get a few more ponies out f my berg 570...

  10. #208
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    Quote Originally Posted by ratman View Post
    if you run a dna air filter, run the akcro header and muffler, install the competition map on the ecu it will run awesome...

    bergos has a 44mm throttle body a big valve ported head and a cam...another company makes a 622cc barrel and piston kit...if you do all that and buy the user setting tool you might get it to run better than the set i initially listed...i instead plan to by a tm 530 super moto for double what it would take to get a few more ponies out f my berg 570...
    I have those first parts you listed minus akra header. It's ok after them.

    Bergos still doesn't sell the camshaft they list. I've asked thousand times but no release date whatsoever. Apparently the stock cam is actually quite good, just the rev limiter needs to be set higher and ignition timing mapped differently. I'm done with them and I have new tuner I'm gonna work with.

    Will have the head ported here and mapped the bike with user setting tool that I have bought. Getting 46mm custom throttle body and stock piston and cylinder machining for more compression from a different company from Germany. Full FMF titanium exhaust too. Should make the Berg fly then.

  11. #209
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    so i realize that the Duke (1,2 and especially 3) seems to be widely stated as NOT a motard. but it IS admittedly probably the first and closest thing to being a street legal tard out of the box. at the very least the true hooligan bike. so whats the opinions on them. the 3 seems like its stepped away a bit from its dirt roots and is heading towards the sportbike side of the family

  12. #210
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    "CRF, Again, race bike. Maintenance intensive, simply not designed for the street.". I have two crf 450x and one has 15,000 mile on it. I've never touched the motor. Just change the oil every 1,000 to 1,500 miles. Keeping chain slides on it with the gearing I'm running.
    Last edited by MJ 88; 04-25-2012 at 07:44 PM.

  13. #211
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    Default Supermono Project

    I want to build a Supermono for road racing based on a high horsepower Supermotard. The KTM 690 Duke would be the logical choice, but they are $$$ and hard to come buy now KTM USA has stopped importing the Duke. My 'goal' is a race only (non street legal) 70+hp 300lb supermono. I built a 58hp 06 YZ450 (race gas, stock bore/stroke, high comp piston, cams etc) SM so I am pretty sure 70+hp is achievable with a bigger engine to start with.

    This is what inspired me http://www.asphaltandrubber.com/bike...690r-mototech/

    The 450 moto thing was tried and didn't go anywhere and I want to build a bike with decent power. So what other bikes will make good power with more emphasis on top end power?

    Fuel injection would be great but I know running a flat slide carb will get just as good gains. A slipper clutch is really a must but if the bike doesn't come with a stock slipper clutch most bikes can be fitted with an aftermarket slipper. Electric start would be good as these built bikes are tough to start and I would like to get rid of the kick starter as it wont clear the fairings, while using rollers to start it is possible it is not always practical. A 6 speed transmission would be ideal, but a 5 speed could be made to work.

    I would be modifying/replacing the swingarm to get a better swingarm angle for road racing as most SM/MX/Dirt bikes have a swingarm too long so it is too flat. I would modifying/replacing the forks and shock as well to get a good setup for road racing. I wouldn't have an issue punching out the cylinder as going big bore helps the top end as well as midrange if the cams are timed correctly.

    Since I will be changing/modifying the forks/shock swingarm and oboviously wheels, so far I have come up with:
    KTM 690/954/640
    KTM 525
    Husky 510/630
    Husaberg 570

    Wont do an Aprilia as I used to work for Aprilia USA....... LOL

    So what do people think would be the best donor/starting platform?

  14. #212
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    Well most people have bad experiences with Aprilia SXV's because of the shoddy dealership work but if you can find a reputable Aprilia mechanic (like Allen Noland for East coast or Amauri on West - both frequent apriliaforum.com) the bikes can be as reliable as any other SM out there. Mine is '08 (bought it last year autumn as a demo unit for $3,000 below the msrp with only like 800 miles on the odo) and that's when they started delivering bikes with good black sealant between cases and not many SXV's that are properly tuned and maintained blow up any more after that. Allen Noland worked on mine and now I have more than 2000 care free miles so far this season (4 oil changes so far and that's it) and the bike is like nothing I have ever ridden. It's derestricted, af1racing single stage air filter and remapped with aprilia race map (15030) and fine tuned by Allen (can't wait to put on a Arrow or Silmoto dual pipe exhaust, hate the Acrapovic side pipe, looks like a canon). I'm coming from 187 whp '08 ZX10R with full Acro race pipe, PC3 and etc and let me tell you, there's nothing like stupid fast V-twin motor screaming to 11000rpm looking like a dirt bike with 180 sportbike rear tire! I'll never sell my Aprilia SXV 550, the bike is simply amazing and I'd suggest everyone that's interested in high power V-twin supermoto bike to try and ride a derestricted/tuned one. Adjusting valves does require taking the motor out of the frame but hey, if that's the price I have to pay to have the fastest/craziest sumo out there then be it. I've heard from Allen that there are race tuned SXV's that put down 95-100HP!!!
    Last edited by bokiny; 06-28-2012 at 01:54 PM.
    2008 Aprilia SXV 550

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    Quote Originally Posted by bokiny View Post
    I've heard from Allen that there are race tuned SXV's that put down 95-100HP!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by bokiny View Post
    Well most people have bad experiences with Aprilia SXV's because of the shoddy dealership work but if you can find a reputable Aprilia mechanic (like Allen Noland for East coast or Amauri on West - both frequent apriliaforum.com) the bikes can be as reliable as any other SM out there. Mine is '08 (bought it last year autumn as a demo unit for $3,000 below the msrp with only like 800 miles on the odo) and that's when they started delivering bikes with good black sealant between cases and not many SXV's that are properly tuned and maintained blow up any more after that. Allen Noland worked on mine and now I have more than 2000 care free miles so far this season (4 oil changes so far and that's it) and the bike is like nothing I have ever ridden. It's derestricted, af1racing single stage air filter and remapped with aprilia race map (15030) and fine tuned by Allen (can't wait to put on a Arrow or Silmoto dual pipe exhaust, hate the Acrapovic side pipe, looks like a canon). I'm coming from 187 whp '08 ZX10R with full Acro race pipe, PC3 and etc and let me tell you, there's nothing like stupid fast V-twin motor screaming to 11000rpm looking like a dirt bike with 180 sportbike rear tire! I'll never sell my Aprilia SXV 550, the bike is simply amazing and I'd suggest everyone that's interested in high power V-twin supermoto bike to try and ride a derestricted/tuned one. Adjusting valves does require taking the motor out of the frame but hey, if that's the price I have to pay to have the fastest/craziest sumo out there then be it. I've heard from Allen that there are race tuned SXV's that put down 95-100HP!!!
    pulling the motor out of the frame to adjust the valves and sketchy reliability issues...made me buy the husaberg fs 570

  17. #215
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    Quote Originally Posted by clarkie View Post
    ^Maybe I got carried away a little and now I'm not sure if that was the number or not but there's a guy from Italy on the apriliaforum.com, Danny87 that has a friend with SXV 550 that's putting down 82HP. Now, he didn't specify if that was at the wheel or crank but if on the wheel then that must be around 90HP on the crank so I wasn't that far off then. I'll ask him and confirm. Don't hate...he he
    2008 Aprilia SXV 550

  18. #216
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    Sorry not hating, I just know Amauri and a lot about these motors

    90-100hp at the crank? rear wheel? DIN? STD? SAE? I used to own a dyno tuning business and it is actually easy to fudge dyno output numbers.

  19. #217
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    90-100hp would be on the crank - I posted a thread on apriliaforum.com since I couldn't find an official dyno numbers of race tuned SXV's or highly tuned ones for that matter anywhere and will post the replies. I also PM'd Danny87 asking him about his friends SXV550 and 82HP he posted it is putting down and I'm waiting for his reply. I certainly don't want to spread missinformation and will apologize if the numbers I wrote down are not realistic or never achieved. I'll PM Allen and Amauri too and see what they'll say. Anyways, the bike is a blast to ride and I'm thinking about never selling this one. Now if I could find a cheap used Arrow or Silmoto dual tip exhaust, load a tune and squeeze a few more ponnies out of it I'd be even happier...
    2008 Aprilia SXV 550

  20. #218
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    Just got a reply from Danny87 (apriliaforum.com) from Italy:

    "82hp to the wheel....the bike is a official sxv550VDB....the bike is prepared and serviced all the time from the world supermoto mechanics in Aprilia! Let's just say that my friend has enough money, and that his VDB is identical to the ones used in the world champioship, with exception to the tuned 550engine prepared by aprilia. Anyway, official VDB engine, cylinder work, titanium rods, titanium pistons, mapping by aprilia mechanics, arrow exhaust, and a few other things....don't no for sure!"

    So that would be around 90-95 on the crank depending on the transmission losses...and I know, there are no dyno charts to prove it but I think I'm going to stop with this now...whatever anybody wants to believe in is fine...
    2008 Aprilia SXV 550

  21. #219
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    I'm looking to buy my first street tard.
    To start off I live in cali so not to many choices. My budget is tight considering I'm 17 so I'm looking for an older bike. The bike will be my daily driver and weekend toy aswell as long distance rides and windy mountain runs. The bike will need to be able to do 70-80 for long distances. Ive been riding motorcycles for 14 years and am comfortable with heavier motorcycles. I've ridden my friends wr426 converted to sm and I feel like it would be a bad choice for long distance rides. I'm leaning towards a drz400 And converting to a supermoto. Any opinions and info would be great

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    DRZ or older TE610 maybe. Older KTMs are paint shakers, newer ones are too expensive... Maybe if you can find a KLX650 converted to a motard, might fit the budget too, and probably better for distance than the smaller displacement bikes.

    Honestly, supermoto and long distance aren't usually spoken in the same sentence unless you mean the twin cylinder big supermotos. My 690 is about the minimum level of comfort I'd consider taking a REAL long ride on.
    -Rob
    2010 KTM 990 SMT, 2008 KTM 690 SMR
    --
    "The KTM really likes being ridden hard. If you never ride like a dumbass, and have no intention of ever riding like a dumbass, KTM probably doesn't make a bike for you."

  23. #221
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    Quote Originally Posted by phxrider View Post
    DRZ or older TE610 maybe. Older KTMs are paint shakers, newer ones are too expensive... Maybe if you can find a KLX650 converted to a motard, might fit the budget too, and probably better for distance than the smaller displacement bikes.

    Honestly, supermoto and long distance aren't usually spoken in the same sentence unless you mean the twin cylinder big supermotos. My 690 is about the minimum level of comfort I'd consider taking a REAL long ride on.
    That's what I thought. I've ridden a few sports bikes and I just don't like them. So ill probably have to go with a drz or xrr and just take it easy on any long rides

  24. #222
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    Husqvarna 610 SM. Reliable and low maintenance compared to the converted mxers.
    2008 Husqvarna SM610

  25. #223
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    Oops I meant SM610, not TE... TE is the dual sport version.
    -Rob
    2010 KTM 990 SMT, 2008 KTM 690 SMR
    --
    "The KTM really likes being ridden hard. If you never ride like a dumbass, and have no intention of ever riding like a dumbass, KTM probably doesn't make a bike for you."

  26. #224
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    Quote Originally Posted by desertbound1024 View Post
    I'm leaning towards a drz400 And converting to a supermoto. Any opinions and info would be great
    Perhaps I am missing something... the DRZ400 is offered (was offered) in 3 models.

    DRZ400e - dirt bike only
    DRZ400s - Dual Sport with Dirt Suspension
    DRZ400sm - Dedicated supermoto (this is what I have)

    I do not live in Cali but I have heard of difficulties in getting a dirt bike (DRZ400e) converted and tagged for on-road use. Not impossible but can be quite difficult.

    I would think going with a DRZ400s or sm would be the way to go. Expect about $3,000 ballpark depending on options on the bike. (East Coast numbers, Cali prices prolly vary.)


    As a DRZ400sm owner who lives in and near some crazy twisties in East TN, I can tell you it's both a blast to ride AND a dangerous bike to ride. Dangerous in the sense that you'll find hooliganism is a bit easy to perform. Not as easy as some of the bigger powerplant supermotos but it's still there. Last thing you want is a bike that wants to do wheelies all the time or go uber fast without thinking about it.

    Just remember it's all fun and games til we see you trying to run from the cops or crash on one of the infamous twisty roads out there.

    You're 17. You are going to want to go fast and do wheelies and do other hooligan things. You know it and I know it. If you do not currently realize you are going to be a hooligan at times, you will after you start to figure out what your bike can and can not do. It's a normal progression. Gear up, get training, practice until you can operate the machine without thinking about it. I heavily suggest you keep the hooligan stuff for off road until you can get your skill level to a point where you are not going to immediately be a threat to other riders or drivers around you. Your basic training to have your motorcycle endorsement/license is not enough. The more time you spend on a motorcycle, the more you realize your "training" will never end. There is always something else to learn or work on. Even professional riders log hundreds of hours of practice each year.


    I love my DRZ400sm but I do not rely on it as my primary machine. It has it's purpose and it does a good job at that, but as others have stated it's not a long(er) distance machine. If you are using it for commuting less than 50 mile runs at a time, I think you will be very happy with it. Keep in mind I say this as a owner of 7 motorcycles including two dedicated long-distance touring bikes.

    Very easy to add a trunk (like a Givi) so you can throw school books or other things (laptop, tablet, etc.) and ride where you need to be.

    When you want to learn a new "trick" or start thinking about doing this or that with your bike... search for those things on youtube so you have an idea of how things can go badly and plan for it accordingly.


    Whatever bike you get, the day it's no longer FUN - it's time to make a change. Enjoy your bike despite those who say negative things about it. Have fun with it, but be safe.
    http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l1...905_035653.jpg

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  27. #225
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJFireUSA View Post
    Perhaps I am missing something... the DRZ400 is offered (was offered) in 3 models.

    DRZ400e - dirt bike only
    DRZ400s - Dual Sport with Dirt Suspension
    DRZ400sm - Dedicated supermoto (this is what I have)

    I do not live in Cali but I have heard of difficulties in getting a dirt bike (DRZ400e) converted and tagged for on-road use. Not impossible but can be quite difficult.

    I would think going with a DRZ400s or sm would be the way to go. Expect about $3,000 ballpark depending on options on the bike. (East Coast numbers, Cali prices prolly vary.)


    As a DRZ400sm owner who lives in and near some crazy twisties in East TN, I can tell you it's both a blast to ride AND a dangerous bike to ride. Dangerous in the sense that you'll find hooliganism is a bit easy to perform. Not as easy as some of the bigger powerplant supermotos but it's still there. Last thing you want is a bike that wants to do wheelies all the time or go uber fast without thinking about it.

    Just remember it's all fun and games til we see you trying to run from the cops or crash on one of the infamous twisty roads out there.

    You're 17. You are going to want to go fast and do wheelies and do other hooligan things. You know it and I know it. If you do not currently realize you are going to be a hooligan at times, you will after you start to figure out what your bike can and can not do. It's a normal progression. Gear up, get training, practice until you can operate the machine without thinking about it. I heavily suggest you keep the hooligan stuff for off road until you can get your skill level to a point where you are not going to immediately be a threat to other riders or drivers around you. Your basic training to have your motorcycle endorsement/license is not enough. The more time you spend on a motorcycle, the more you realize your "training" will never end. There is always something else to learn or work on. Even professional riders log hundreds of hours of practice each year.


    I love my DRZ400sm but I do not rely on it as my primary machine. It has it's purpose and it does a good job at that, but as others have stated it's not a long(er) distance machine. If you are using it for commuting less than 50 mile runs at a time, I think you will be very happy with it. Keep in mind I say this as a owner of 7 motorcycles including two dedicated long-distance touring bikes.

    Very easy to add a trunk (like a Givi) so you can throw school books or other things (laptop, tablet, etc.) and ride where you need to be.

    When you want to learn a new "trick" or start thinking about doing this or that with your bike... search for those things on youtube so you have an idea of how things can go badly and plan for it accordingly.


    Whatever bike you get, the day it's no longer FUN - it's time to make a change. Enjoy your bike despite those who say negative things about it. Have fun with it, but be safe.
    I do know I will end up doing hooligan stuff. I know the consequences of doing it because I have been riding motorcycle since I was 3. I'm not stupid like most teens my age and I don't put my self in situations where I will hurt myself and especially others. I will have to do a lot more research before I come up with a decision. And the drz-e has more hp stock that's why I want one to convert or find one already street legal

  28. #226
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    Kool!

    Sounds like you already know exactly what you want.

    Course if you can get the s or sm and then send the motor to eddie you'll have a 50 hp motor at that point and then the real fun can begin.
    http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l1...905_035653.jpg

    Join the riding game!
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  29. #227
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    Could someone school me on Husky's? I keep hearing that their maintenance schedules are very strict and frequent, but I've never actually heard a definitive answer. I've always liked the look of the Husky's, but if it's not really a commuter, then I don't want anything to do with it.

    Any input?

  30. #228
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAZRBAKK View Post
    Could someone school me on Husky's? I keep hearing that their maintenance schedules are very strict and frequent, but I've never actually heard a definitive answer. I've always liked the look of the Husky's, but if it's not really a commuter, then I don't want anything to do with it.

    Any input?
    Razrbakk,

    I need some schooling too. I have been lurking around for bout 2 years and might be getting an 06 SMR 510 w 3000 from a 47 year old grandpa. It has no mods and is clean enough to eat off. The issue is reliability. Don't mind checking valves and 500 mile oil changes. I want to rid it as a commuter, 10 miles both ways, no highway. I have heard they an go 13,000 without a problem, or they need a top end at 3,000. Real feedback from ole who has one would be greatly appreciated.

  31. #229
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    [QUOTE=parkinglotracer92;379623]I've noticed a lot of repeat questions in the original "best street-tard" thread, and also that a lot of people don't want to read through all 47 pages. I've gone through all the posts in the previously mention thread, and I think I've summed it up fairly well. I've anyone has any more info to ad, go ahead, but please don't fill it up with "which is better, drz vs. husky 510".

    ************************************************** **************

    STREET:

    KTM LC4 640, 3000 mile oil changes. Great for commuting. They require (relatively) little maintenance, and are not "pure race motors" at all.

    KTM 625, excellent bike, excellent components, excellent handling. There is no reliability drawback over anything else, it's fast and fun. The 625SMC is arguably one of the best street-tards. KTM does all the hard work for you and sells them street legal from the factory. Their only drawback is that they vibrate. Bad. Some people think it shakes too much for street riding.

    Where does the KTM 525 exc fit on this list?

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